Beautiful Beasties is an international network of professional pet photographers, of which I am very privileged to be a part of. Within the network a group was formed for photographers who wanted to participate in a project, a 52 week project. Each week a theme is chosen and posted, then we all go out and take a photograph or series of photographs to fit the theme, then we all post onto our own websites and form a ring by linking all the websites. That means you can look at my images and then follow the links all over the world to see what other pet photographers are capturing.

 

The theme for week 9, chosen by – Erin, from Charlottesville, USA, is “Shooting From The Hip” – the generally accepted definition of shooting from the hip is – ” holding your camera at waist-level, and shooting upwards without looking through the viewfinder. One of the reasons why this technique is widely popular is because it allows you to take much more candid images of people, as they do not see you shooting them with your eye through your viewfinder, and assume you aren’t taking images. Another thing is that when shooting from the hip, you often get a much more interesting perspective as you shoot from a much lower perspective.”

Now as we are shooting animals and not people I thought I would try a slightly different version of this technique – by heading out to my chicken yard armed with camera – new gumboots and treats – instead of shooting upwards I have shot down to see what/how my chickens behave when I am with them….

First off, I practised with my trusty side-kick, Skarla

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That was not too hard! So off to the chickens I went…

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The biggest problem I had with this challenge was getting the focus right as the chickens moved quite quickly and very close to me. So I changed track a little and while still ‘shooting-from-the-hip’ I did not shoot down but rather out to my side, this not only gave me better results, it also engaged the chickens more – especially Blizzard, my little rooster…

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This was a fun weeks challenge, now follow the links and see what or who all the other photographers have captured, starting with – Sydney & MAC Creative Designs – Pet Photography and Portraiture for the Washington DC Metro Area – and following the links all the way back here.

I hope you have enjoyed this weeks theme.

S.

Well, last post, I showed you a sneak of the Mini-Beasts I have been photographing, so let me show you some more!

First up we have

Macropanesthia rhinoceros

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The giant burrowing cockroach is also known as the rhinoceros cockroach . They are native to Australia and mostly found in tropical parts of Queensland. They are the world’s heaviest species of cockroach and can weigh up to 35g and measure up to 80mm in length. They can live for up to 10 years. Unlike some other cockroaches, they do not have wings and are not considered pests. The cockroach plays a vital part in the ecosystem by consuming dead leaves, eucalyptus in particular, and recycling other matter. True to their name, they may burrow down in soil to a depth of about 1m, where they make permanent homes.

 

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These guys make awesome pets and are really super amazing!

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Next up we have

Archispirostreptus gigas

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the giant African millipede, is one of the largest millipedes, growing up to 38.5 centimetres in length, 67 millimetres in circumference. It has approximately 256 legs, although the number of legs changes with each moulting so it can vary according to each individual.

It is a widespread species in lowland parts of East Africa, from Mozambique to Kenya, but rarely reaches altitudes above 1,000 metres. It lives mostly in forests, but can also be found in areas of coastal habitat which contain at least a few trees.

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In general, giant millipedes have a life expectancy of about 5–7 years. Giant millipedes have two main modes of defence if they feel threatened: curling into a tight spiral exposing only the hard exoskeleton, and secretion of an irritating liquid from pores on their body. This liquid can be harmful if introduced into the eyes or mouth.

Yeah, no-one warned me about the super-stinky-clothes-staining yellow liquid! That was a surprise!!

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But this guy was amazing to watch and photograph – a big thanks to Matt at Squawks Pet Store for letting me borrow his Mini-Beasts. Both these Mini-Beasts and a few more are available through Squawks, watch this space for more photographs!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beautiful Beasties is an international network of professional pet photographers, of which I am very privileged to be a part of. Within the network a group was formed for photographers who wanted to participate in a project, a 52 week project. Each week a theme is chosen and posted, then we all go out and take a photograph or series of photographs to fit the theme, then we all post onto our own websites and form a ring by linking all the websites. That means you can look at my images and then follow the links all over the world to see what other pet photographers are capturing.

 

The theme for week 8, which was chosen by Shelley Castle in the United States, is Black & White. Shelley writes as our brief this week “We have been having lots of odd weather days and I have been shooting inside more….This is when I tend to sit back study light and love to shoot in black and white. Winter light seems so magical when applied this way. Have fun and get creative!”

Well, while we here in the Southern Hemisphere are in the middle of summer, our weather has ben fairly unpredictable anyway! But I love black & white no matter what the season, so here are a couple of shots I have taken in my mini table top studio, processed in black & white…

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(watch for my next post which will be more about all the mini-beasts featured above)

Now, don’t forget, this is an international blog ring, so starting with 100 Loyal Faces Photography, Perth, Australia (yay another Aussie!) keep following all the links until you get here to me and my mini-beasts.

I hope you all enjoy this weeks Black & White journey.

S.

 

Beautiful Beasties is an international network of professional pet photographers, of which I am very privileged to be a part of. Within the network a group was formed for photographers who wanted to participate in a project, a 52 week project. Each week a theme is chosen and posted, then we all go out and take a photograph or series of photographs to fit the theme, then we all post onto our own websites and form a ring by linking all the websites. That means you can look at my images and then follow the links all over the world to see what other pet photographers are capturing.

 

The theme for week 6 is – Wide Open – We are free to interpret this however we would like! Does it mean shooting with our aperture wide open? Or going to a wide open space? With our wet raining weather this week shooting of any type was always going to be fun (difficult) so for my interpretation of the theme I was going to go with wide open spaces – but most of our wide open spaces here are waterways or the ocean and I just didn’t have time to get the shot I wanted, so I changed my mind and had to think outside the box….

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While doing some agility training this afternoon, Skarla needed a bit of a fresher on the broad jump, and I thought  – “Hey! The broad jump loosely fits the ‘wide open’ theme!” so with my little guy as assistant handler we got Skarla in a ‘wide-open’ body frame over the broad jump…

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but then she started to cheat!! I told you she needed a refresher!! Luckily Blue was there again to show her what a ‘wide-open’ body frame over the broad jump really looks like…

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I hope you accept my slightly out of the box take on the theme this week, now follow the links all around the ring to see what all the other photographers captured, starting with Kelly Wolfe, Pet Photographer from the Waikato, New Zealand.

See you all next week.

S xo